Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Health Promot. 2011 Jan-Feb;25(3):190-8. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.090123-QUAN-29.

Young children's weight trajectories and associated risk factors: results from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort.

Author information

  • 1School of Social Work, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Brian.Moss@wayne.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To estimate the prevalence of U.S. children's overweight risk and obesity at age 9 months and at age 2 years, to assess weight changes between the two periods, and to examine relationships between weight status (i.e., normal, at risk, or obese) changes and demographic variables.

DESIGN:

Analyses of children's early weight trajectories and related demographic characteristics from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) are presented.

SETTING:

United States.

SUBJECTS:

The 9-month-old (n  =  8900) and 2-year-old (n  =  7500) ECLS-B waves were used to generate nationally representative estimates of obese and at-risk children born in 2001.

MEASURES:

Measures included child's sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, community locale, geographic region, and weight status.

ANALYSIS:

Logistic and multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine the odds of children's demographic characteristics being related to weight persistence, loss, or gain.

RESULTS:

Approximately one-third of U.S. children were either at risk or obese at 9 months (31.9%) and at 2 years (34.3%). Some children were at greater risk (e.g., Hispanics and low socioeconomic status children), while others had reduced risk (e.g., females and Asian/Pacific Islanders). Additional results from two trajectory models generally corroborated patterns of status change due to weight gain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Between age 9 months and age 2 years, U.S. children consistently moved toward less desirable weight status. Obesity risk was not uniform across demographic subgroups, suggesting that health policy might focus on those children at greatest risk.

PMID:
21192749
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Allen Press, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk