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Proc Biol Sci. 2011 Apr 7;278(1708):961-9. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2010.2433. Epub 2010 Dec 22.

Genomic signatures of diet-related shifts during human origins.

Author information

  • 1Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA. courtney.babbitt@duke.edu

Abstract

There are numerous anthropological analyses concerning the importance of diet during human evolution. Diet is thought to have had a profound influence on the human phenotype, and dietary differences have been hypothesized to contribute to the dramatic morphological changes seen in modern humans as compared with non-human primates. Here, we attempt to integrate the results of new genomic studies within this well-developed anthropological context. We then review the current evidence for adaptation related to diet, both at the level of sequence changes and gene expression. Finally, we propose some ways in which new technologies can help identify specific genomic adaptations that have resulted in metabolic and morphological differences between humans and non-human primates.

PMID:
21177690
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3049039
Free PMC Article

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