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Addict Behav. 2011 Apr;36(4):294-301. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2010.11.009. Epub 2010 Nov 27.

Individual and family factors associated with intention to quit among male Vietnamese American smokers: implications for intervention development.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. jtsoh@lppi.ucsf.edu

Abstract

Smoking prevalence among Vietnamese American males remains higher than the U.S. general population. This study examined the associations of individual and family factors with quit intention among Vietnamese male smokers in California to guide intervention development to reduce their smoking prevalence. Data for Vietnamese male current smokers (n=234) in the 2008 California Vietnamese Adult Tobacco Use Survey (N=1101 males) were analyzed to describe quit intention and previous quit attempts. One-third of Vietnamese male smokers (33%) had no intention to quit at any time, 36% intended to quit soon (in the next 30 days), and 31% intended to quit later (beyond the next 30 days). Half (51.7%) of the sample was in "precontemplation," indicating no intention to quit within 6 months. Many (71%) had made a serious quit attempt in the past year, but 68% of those who tried to quit used no cessation assistance. Multivariate logistic regression adjusting for age, depression, smoking intensity, nicotine dependence, health knowledge, children in the household and home smoking ban revealed that having smoking-related family conflicts and a quit attempt in the past year with or without assistance were independently associated with an intention to quit either in the next 30 days or later. Higher education was associated with no intention to quit. Findings underscore the importance of designing strategic interventions that meet the needs of smokers at both individual and family levels to promote quit intention and to facilitate successful quitting in this population.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21177041
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3056150
Free PMC Article
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