Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
J Neurol Sci. 2011 Feb 15;301(1-2):9-11. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2010.11.018. Epub 2010 Dec 16.

Cerebral blood flow is reduced in chronic fatigue syndrome as assessed by arterial spin labeling.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark NJ, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic fatigue syndrome is diagnosed by a set of clinical criteria and therefore is probably heterogeneous. Earlier reports tested the hypothesis that the syndrome had a neurological substrate by doing studies of cerebral blood flow (CBF) but with discrepant results. One possible reason for the discrepancy was that relative CBF was assessed. We found reduced CBF in an earlier study of absolute CBF using xenon-CT. The purpose of this study was to use a second method of assessing CBF and to look within the study group for heterogeneity of responses.

METHOD:

Eleven CFS patients and 10 age matched healthy controls underwent neuroimaging using arterial spin labeling to determine their regional and global absolute CBF. A template was constructed based on the control data, and individual patient montages were compared on a case by case basis to determine if differences in regions of interest occurred.

RESULTS:

The patients as a group had significantly lower global CBF than the controls. The reduction in CBF occurred across nearly every region assessed. Nine of the 11 patients showed these reductions compared to the average control data, while two patients showed actual increases relative to the controls.

CONCLUSION:

The data extend our earlier observation that CFS patients as a group have broad decreases in CBF compared to healthy controls. However, as expected, the effect was not homogeneous in that 2 of the 11 patients studied showed actual increases in CBF relative to controls.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21167506
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3139492
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk