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Oncologist. 2010;15(12):1329-34. doi: 10.1634/theoncologist.2010-0105. Epub 2010 Dec 8.

Corticosteroid use in patients with glioblastoma at first or second relapse treated with bevacizumab in the BRAIN study.

Author information

  • 1Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. vrede001@mc.duke.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors have corticosteroid-sparing effects in patients with high-grade gliomas. We assessed corticosteroid use in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab (BEV) in the BRAIN study (J Clin Oncol 2009;27:4733-4740).

METHODS:

BRAIN was a phase II, multicenter, randomized, noncomparative trial of BEV alone (n = 85) or in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11) (n = 82) in adults with recurrent glioblastoma. Median corticosteroid dose for patients who used corticosteroids at baseline was summarized by treatment arm; the percentage of patients who had sustained (≥50% corticosteroid dose reduction for ≥50% of time on study drug) or complete (discontinuation of corticosteroid for ≥25% of time on study drug) reduction in corticosteroid dose overall and by objective response and progression-free survival was calculated. The incidence of corticosteroid-related adverse events was summarized.

RESULTS:

In each treatment group, 50% of patients were using systemic corticosteroids at baseline. The majority of those experienced a reduction in dose while receiving BEV-based therapy. Thirteen (30.2%) BEV and 20 (46.5%) BEV + CPT-11 patients had a sustained reduction of corticosteroid dose; 7 (16.3%) BEV and 9 (20.9%) BEV + CPT-11 patients had a complete reduction of corticosteroid dose. The majority of patients who had an objective response or progression-free survival >6 months experienced corticosteroid dose reduction. Approximately 64% of patients who used corticosteroids while receiving BEV-based therapy experienced infection.

CONCLUSION:

BEV may have corticosteroid-sparing effects in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Corticosteroid reduction may positively affect patient health-related quality of life. Given the exploratory nature of the analyses in a noncomparative study, these results should be interpreted cautiously.

PMID:
21147867
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3227925
Free PMC Article
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