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J Pediatr. 2011 May;158(5):709-714.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.10.016. Epub 2010 Dec 13.

Cardiovascular impact of the pediatric obesity epidemic: higher left ventricular mass is related to higher body mass index.

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  • 1Division of Cardiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare secular changes in body mass index (BMI) and left ventricular mass (LVM) in today's children versus children of a generation earlier.

STUDY DESIGN:

All healthy patients aged 2 to 19 years who underwent echocardiography at a single US academic medical center in 1986 to 1989 (prior era) and 2008 (current era) were included in this retrospective cross-sectional study. BMI, BMI z score, LVM indexed to height (LVMI), LVM z score, and relative wall thickness were calculated. Cardiac geometries were assigned based on LVM z score and relative wall thickness and classified as normal, concentric hypertrophy, eccentric hypertrophy, or concentric remodeling. Stepwise regression analysis was performed to identify determinants of LVMI.

RESULTS:

There were 350 subjects in the prior era and 350 age- and sex-matched subjects in the current era. Mean BMI and LVMI were both significantly higher in the current era than in the prior era (BMI, 19.9 ± 5.6 kg/m(2) vs 18.1 ± 3.8 kg/m(2), P = .0004; LVMI, 32.7 ± 7.8 g/m(2.7) vs 31.5 ± 8.1 g/m(2.7); P = .02). Determinants of LVMI in both eras were BMI z score, younger age, male sex, and African-American race.

CONCLUSIONS:

Today's children have higher BMI, LVMI, and predicted cardiovascular risk than their counterparts a generation earlier. Reversal of these trends is needed, and intervention is required.

Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

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PMID:
21147488
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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