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J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2011 Jan;66(1):75-86. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbq088. Epub 2010 Dec 6.

Mortality and morbidity trends: is there compression of morbidity?

Author information

  • 1Andrus Gerontology Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. 90089-0191, USA. crimmin@usc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This paper reviews trends in mortality and morbidity to evaluate whether there has been a compression of morbidity.

METHODS:

Review of recent research and analysis of recent data for the United States relating mortality change to the length of life without 1 of 4 major diseases or loss of mobility functioning.

RESULTS:

Mortality declines have slowed down in the United States in recent years, especially for women. The prevalence of disease has increased. Age-specific prevalence of a number of risk factors representing physiological status has stayed relatively constant; where risks decline, increased usage of effective drugs is responsible. Mobility functioning has deteriorated. Length of life with disease and mobility functioning loss has increased between 1998 and 2008.

DISCUSSION:

Empirical findings do not support recent compression of morbidity when morbidity is defined as major disease and mobility functioning loss.

PMID:
21135070
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3001754
Free PMC Article
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