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Childs Nerv Syst. 2011 May;27(5):757-64. doi: 10.1007/s00381-010-1351-3. Epub 2010 Dec 4.

Neurofibromatosis-2 and spinal cord ependymomas: Report of two cases and review of the literature.

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  • 1Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service at Children's Health Care of Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Abstract

OBJECT:

The incidence of ependymoma in patients with neurofibromatosis-2 (NF-2) is low and information regarding treatment and prognosis is lacking. We present two cases of cervicomedullary tumors in patients with NF-2 from our institution, and we provide a review of the literature in order to summarize the known clinical information about this rare occurrence.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Patient #1 had histological confirmation of ependymoma and was treated with subtotal resection followed by observation and has had no evidence of progression for 11 months. Patient #2 has been observed for 4 1/2 years without treatment for a cervicomedullary tumor, which appears to be an ependymoma by imaging. Although it has increased in size very slowly, there have been no clinical symptoms. Among the additional 21 cases of NF-2 and ependymoma from the literature, the most common location is the cervical spine (70%), and the median age at diagnosis is 15 years. Surgical resection was performed in 85% of the cases and subtotal resection in 64% of cases. Fifteen patients (75%) were reported alive at the time of the published reports, with survival ranging from 0.1 to 10 years, and the 8-year survival estimated as 51%. Survival was related to the location of the tumor.

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude from our two cases and review of the existing literature that NF-2 associated spinal ependymomas have an indolent course and typically can be observed or treated by surgical excision alone.

PMID:
21132433
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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