Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Prev Med. 2011 Feb;52(2):164-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2010.11.023. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

Participation and cardiovascular risk reduction in a voluntary worksite nutrition and physical activity program.

Author information

  • 1General Medicine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. athorndike@partners.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In a cohort of employees participating in a worksite nutrition and physical activity program, we compared program completion and changes in cardiovascular risk factors by baseline body mass index.

METHODS:

In 2007, 774 employees enrolled in a 10 week program at a hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Program completion and change in weight, cholesterol, and blood pressure were compared between obese (body mass index≥30), overweight (body mass index=25-29.9), and normal weight (body mass index<25) participants.

RESULTS:

At baseline, 63% were obese or overweight and had higher blood pressure and cholesterol compared to normal weight participants. Program completion was 82% and did not differ by body mass index. Mean weight loss was 1.9 kg at end of program (p<0.001) and 0.4 kg at 1 year (p=0.002). At end of program, participants with body mass index≥30 lost 3.0% body weight vs. 2.7% for body mass index=25-29.9 and 1.7% for body mass index<25 (p<0.001), but weight loss at 1 year did not differ by body mass index. Mean cholesterol and blood pressure were lower at end of program and 1 year (all, p<0.005) but did not differ by body mass index.

CONCLUSIONS:

Worksite programs can successfully initiate cardiovascular risk reduction among employees, but more intensive interventions are needed to make significant improvements in the health of higher risk obese employees.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21130804
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3026874
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk