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Biochimie. 2011 Mar;93(3):377-88. doi: 10.1016/j.biochi.2010.11.010. Epub 2010 Dec 2.

The CCN family: a new class of inflammation modulators?

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  • 1INSERM, UMR_S 938, Centre de Recherche de Saint-Antoine, Hôpital Saint-Antoine, 184 rue du fg. Saint-Antoine, Paris, France.

Abstract

Uncontrolled or sustained inflammation is the underlying cause of or actively contributes to the progression of many chronic pathologies such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, or neuroinflammatory diseases. Matricellular proteins of the CCN family (CYR61/CTGF/NOV) have emerged as localized multitasking signal integrators. These structurally conserved secreted proteins specifically interact with and signal through various extracellular partners, in particular integrins, which enable them to play crucial roles in various processes including development, angiogenesis, wound healing and diseases such as fibrosis, vascular disease and cancer. In this review, we discuss the possibility that the CCN family members could represent a putative new class of modulators of inflammation. In this context, we focused on their relationship with cytokines and chemokines. In vitro, CCN expression is finely regulated by diverse inflammatory mediators including cytokines (TNFα, IL1β, TGF-β), small factors such as prostaglandins, nitric oxide, histamine and serotonin, and extracellular matrix enzymes. In addition, CCN proteins acting alone or in concert with their specific partners appear to be potent regulators of the production of cytokines and chemokines in a context-dependent manner. Finally, emerging studies suggest a potential role for CCN proteins in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory kidney diseases and neuroinflammatory pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease. CCN members could therefore represent new potential therapeutic targets for drug development against such diseases.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21130134
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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