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Fertil Steril. 2011 Mar 1;95(3):1025-30. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2010.11.006. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

Physical activity and semen quality among men attending an infertility clinic.

Author information

  • 1Slone Epidemiology Center, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. lwise@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between regular physical activity and semen quality.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Couples attending one of three IVF clinics in the greater Boston area during 1993-2003. At study entry, male participants completed a questionnaire about their general health, medical history, and physical activity. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived using generalized estimating equations models, accounting for potential confounders and multiple samples per man.

PATIENT(S):

A total of 2,261 men contributing 4,565 fresh semen samples were enrolled before undergoing their first IVF cycles.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm motility, sperm morphology, and total motile sperm (TMS).

RESULT(S):

Overall, none of the semen parameters were materially associated with regular exercise. Compared with no regular exercise, bicycling ≥ 5 h/wk was associated with low sperm concentration (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.03-3.56) and low TMS (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.19-3.56). These associations did not vary appreciably by age, body mass index, or history of male factor infertility.

CONCLUSION(S):

Although the present study suggests no overall association between regular physical activity and semen quality, bicycling ≥ 5 h/wk was associated with lower sperm concentration and TMS.

Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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PMID:
21122845
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3043154
Free PMC Article
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