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J Appl Psychol. 2011 May;96(3):485-500. doi: 10.1037/a0021452.

Antecedents and outcomes of organizational support for development: the critical role of career opportunities.

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  • 1University of Iowa, Department of Management & Organizations, 108 John Pappajohn Business Building, Iowa City, IA 52242-1994, USA. maria-kraimer@uiowa.edu

Abstract

This study examines antecedents and behavioral outcomes of employees' perceptions of organizational support for development. We first propose that employees' past participation in formal developmental activities and experience with developmental relationships positively relate to their perceptions of organizational support for development. We then propose that perceived career opportunity within the organization moderates the relationship between organizational support for development and employee performance and turnover. Using a sample of 264 exempt-level employees and their supervisors, we found that participation in training classes, leader-member exchange, and career mentoring were each positively related to employees' perceptions of organizational support for development. We also found support for the moderator hypotheses. Specifically, development support positively related to job performance, but only when perceived career opportunity within the organization was high. Further, development support was associated with reduced voluntary turnover when perceived career opportunity was high, but it was associated with increased turnover when perceived career opportunity was low. Our study demonstrates that social exchange and career motivation theory work together to explain when and how employees' perceptions of organizational support for development relate to turnover and job performance.

PMID:
21114356
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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