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J Vet Sci. 2010 Dec;11(4):363-5.

Prevalence and patterns of self-reported animal-related injury among veterinarians in metropolitan Kampala.

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  • 1Pathobiology Academic Program, School of Veterinary Medicine, St. George's University, P.O Box 7, St. George's Grenada, West Indies. rkabuusu@sgu.edu

Abstract

To establish the prevalence, patterns and risk factors of animal-related injuries among veterinarians, self-administered questionnaires were given to 60 veterinarians practicing in metropolitan Kampala. The prevalence of animal-related injuries in metropolitan Kampala was 72% (95%CI, 57~84). Some veterinarians (34%) suffered multiple injuries with a mean and median of 2.1 and 2.0 injuries per veterinarian, respectively. Of a total of 70 self-reported animal related injuries, cattle accounted for 72%, cats for 25%, dogs for 23%, self inoculation for 15% and birds for 13%. Injuries associated with poultry did not require hospital treatment. The upper limb was the most the frequently (68%) injured anatomical body part of veterinarians, and vaccination of animals (25%) was the major activity associated with injury. Animal-related injuries are common among practicing veterinarians in metropolitan Kampala; however, they did not differ significantly based on the veterinarian's gender, experience or risk awareness.

PMID:
21113109
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2998751
Free PMC Article
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