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J Pediatr Psychol. 2011 May;36(4):451-60. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsq105. Epub 2010 Nov 26.

Associations between parent behavior and adolescent weight control.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 1, Hoppin Street, Providence, RI 02903, USA. asato@lifespan.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate associations between parent behaviors (i.e., parent weight change, self-monitoring of their behavior, and feeding practices and attitudes) and changes in adolescent BMI and weight following 16-weeks of behavioral weight control (BWC) intervention.

METHOD:

Adolescents (N = 86) 13-16 years old and 30-90% overweight (M = 60.54%, SD = 15.10%) who completed BWC intervention and their parents. Adolescents were randomized to 1 of 2 interventions involving 16 consecutive weeks of active treatment with 4 biweekly maintenance sessions. Adolescent weight and BMI were measured at baseline and 16-weeks. Feeding practices were measured at baseline. Parent self-monitoring was measured during the intervention.

RESULTS:

The only independently significant predictor of adolescent BMI change (p < .01) was parent BMI change. Greater parent self-monitoring (p < .01) predicted greater adolescent weight loss. Greater parent pressure to eat predicted less adolescent weight loss (p < .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings highlight the potential importance of parent weight-related behaviors and feeding practices in the context of adolescent BWC.

PMID:
21112925
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3079126
Free PMC Article
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