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J Inherit Metab Dis. 2011 Feb;34(1):159-64. doi: 10.1007/s10545-010-9242-z. Epub 2010 Nov 26.

Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere and Fazio Londe syndrome is associated with a riboflavin transporter defect mimicking mild MADD: a new inborn error of metabolism with potential treatment.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. a.m.bosch@amc.nl

Abstract

We report on three patients (two siblings and one unrelated) presenting in infancy with progressive muscle weakness and paralysis of the diaphragm. Metabolic studies revealed a profile of plasma acylcarnitines and urine organic acids suggestive of a mild form of the multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation defect (MADD, ethylmalonic/adipic acid syndrome). Subsequently, a profound flavin deficiency in spite of a normal dietary riboflavin intake was established in the plasma of all three children, suggesting a riboflavin transporter defect. Genetic analysis of these patients demonstrated mutations in the C20orf54 gene which encodes the human homolog of a rat riboflavin transporter. This gene was recently implicated in the Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, a rare neurological disorder which may either present in infancy with neurological deterioration with hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency and early death, or later in life with deafness and progressive ponto-bulbar palsy. Supplementation of riboflavin rapidly improved the clinical symptoms as well as the biochemical abnormalities in our patients, demonstrating that high dose riboflavin is a potential treatment for the Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome as well as for the Fazio Londe syndrome which is considered to be the same disease entity without the deafness.

PMID:
21110228
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3026695
Free PMC Article
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