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J Invest Dermatol. 2011 Mar;131(3):688-97. doi: 10.1038/jid.2010.351. Epub 2010 Nov 25.

TLR2 expression is increased in rosacea and stimulates enhanced serine protease production by keratinocytes.

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  • 1Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, VA San Diego Health Care System, San Diego, California, USA. kyamasaki@med.tohoku.ac.jp

Abstract

A diverse environment challenges skin to maintain temperature, hydration, and electrolyte balance while also maintaining normal immunological function. Rosacea is a common skin disease that manifests unique inflammatory responses to normal environmental stimuli. We hypothesized that abnormal function of innate immune pattern recognition could explain the enhanced sensitivity of patients with rosacea, and observed that the epidermis of patients with rosacea expressed higher amounts of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) than normal patients. Increased expression of TLR2 was not seen in other inflammatory skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. Overexpression of TLR2 on keratinocytes, treatment with TLR2 ligands, and analysis of TLR2-deficient mice resulted in a calcium-dependent release of kallikrein 5 from keratinocytes, a critical protease involved in the pathogenesis of rosacea. These observations show that abnormal TLR2 function may explain enhanced inflammatory responses to environmental stimuli and can act as a critical element in the pathogenesis of rosacea.

PMID:
21107351
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3085277
Free PMC Article

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