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AIDS. 2011 Jan 14;25(2):221-8. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0b013e328340fee2.

A prospective study of alcohol consumption and HIV acquisition among injection drug users.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27559-7435, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

to estimate the effect of alcohol consumption on HIV acquisition while appropriately accounting for confounding by time-varying risk factors.

DESIGN:

african-American injection drug users in the AIDS Link to Intravenous Experience cohort study. Participants were recruited and followed with semiannual visits in Baltimore, Maryland between 1988 and 2008.

METHODS:

marginal structural models were used to estimate the effect of alcohol consumption on HIV acquisition.

RESULTS:

at entry, 28% of 1525 participants were women with a median (quartiles) age of 37 (32-42) years and 10 (10-12) years of formal education. During follow-up, 155 participants acquired HIV and alcohol consumption was 24, 24, 26, 17, and 9% for 0, 1-5, 6-20, 21-50, and 51-140 drinks per week over the prior 2 years, respectively. In analyses accounting for sociodemographic factors, drug use, and sexual activity, hazard ratios for participants reporting 1-5, 6-20, 21-50, and 51-140 drinks per week in the prior 2 years compared to participants who reported 0 drinks per week were 1.09 (0.60-1.98), 1.18 (0.66-2.09), 1.66 (0.94-2.93), and 2.12 (1.15-3.90), respectively. A trend test indicated a dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption and HIV acquisition (P value for trend = 9.7 × 10).

CONCLUSION:

a dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption and subsequent HIV acquisition is indicated, independent of measured known risk factors.

2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

PMID:
21099668
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3006640
Free PMC Article

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