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Health Psychol. 2010 Nov;29(6):583-93. doi: 10.1037/a0021387.

Tailored versus generic interventions for skin cancer risk reduction for family members of melanoma patients.

Author information

  • 1Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA. mannesl@umdnj.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Improving strategies for risk reduction among family members of patients with melanoma may reduce their risk for melanoma.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of two behavioral interventions designed to improve the frequency of total cutaneous skin examination by a health provider (TCE), skin self-examination (SSE), and sun protection among first degree relatives of patients with melanoma; and to evaluate whether increased intentions, increased benefits, decreased barriers, and improved sunscreen self-efficacy mediated the effects of the tailored intervention, as compared with the generic intervention on TCE, SSE, or sun protection.

METHODS:

Four hundred forty-three family members (56 parents, 248 siblings, 239 children) who were nonadherent with these practices were randomly assigned to either a generic (N = 218) or a tailored intervention (N = 225) which included 3 print mailings and 1 telephone session. Participants completed measures of TCE, SSE, and sun protections at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year, and measures of intentions, benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy at baseline and 6 months.

RESULTS:

Those enrolled in the tailored intervention had almost a twofold increased probability of having a TCE ( p < .0001). Treatment effects in favor of the tailored intervention were also noted for sun protection habits ( p < .02). Increases in TCE intentions mediated the tailored intervention's effects on TCE. Increases in sun protection intentions mediated effects of the tailored intervention's effect on sun protection.

CONCLUSIONS:

Tailored interventions may improve risk reduction practices among family members of patients with melanoma.

© 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

PMID:
21090893
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3058834
Free PMC Article
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