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Nat Rev Nephrol. 2011 Jan;7(1):11-21. doi: 10.1038/nrneph.2010.154. Epub 2010 Nov 16.

Epidemiology of hypertensive kidney disease.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, 924 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637-1455, USA.

Abstract

The prevalence of hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) attributable to hypertension continues to rise worldwide. Identifying the precise prevalence of CKD attributable to hypertension is difficult owing to the absence of uniform criteria to establish a diagnosis of hypertensive nephropathy. Despite the increasing prevalence of CKD-associated hypertension, awareness of hypertension among individuals with CKD remains suboptimal and rates of blood-pressure control remain poor. Targeted subgroups involved in studies of CKD seem to reach better rates of blood-pressure control, suggesting that this therapeutic goal can be achieved in patients with CKD. Elevated blood-pressure levels are associated with CKD progression. However, the optimal blood-pressure level and pharmacological agent remains unclear. Physicians treating patients with CKD must recognize the importance of maintaining optimal salt and volume balance to achieve blood-pressure goals. Furthermore, agents that modify the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis can be an important adjunct to therapy and physicians must monitor expected changes in serum creatinine and electrolyte levels after their administration. Hypertension remains a common factor complicating CKD. Future investigations identifying early signs of hypertension-related CKD, increasing awareness of the effects of hypertension in CKD and determining optimal therapeutic interventions might help reduce the incidence of hypertensive nephropathy.

PMID:
21079654
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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