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J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Nov;52(11):1098-105. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181f72b7c.

An update of cancer incidence in the Agricultural Health Study.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health/DHHS, 6120 Executive Blvd., Rockville, MD 20852, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective is to reevaluate cancer incidence among Agricultural Health Study participants.

METHODS:

Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and relative standardized ratios were calculated.

RESULTS:

A significant excess of prostate cancer was seen for private and commercial applicators (SIR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.14, 1.25 and SIR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.61, respectively). Excesses were observed for lip cancer (SIR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.02, 3.44) and multiple myeloma (SIR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.95) among private applicators from North Carolina and for marginal zone lymphoma among Iowa spouses (SIR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.21, 4.09).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although lower rates of smoking and increased physical activity probably contribute to the lower overall cancer incidence, agricultural exposures including pesticides, viruses, bacteria, sunlight, and other chemicals may increase risks for specific cancer sites.

PMID:
21063187
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3052640
Free PMC Article
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