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Mol Plant Microbe Interact. 2011 Feb;24(2):271-84. doi: 10.1094/MPMI-07-10-0148.

The Pseudomonas secondary metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol is a signal inducing rhizoplane expression of Azospirillum genes involved in plant-growth promotion.

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  • 1Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France.

Abstract

During evolution, plants have become associated with guilds of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), which raises the possibility that individual PGPR populations may have developed mechanisms to cointeract with one another on plant roots. We hypothesize that this has resulted in signaling phenomena between different types of PGPR colonizing the same roots. Here, the objective was to determine whether the Pseudomonas secondary metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) can act as a signal on Azospirillum PGPR and enhance the phytostimulation effects of the latter. On roots, the DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 strain but not its phl-negative mutant enhanced the phytostimulatory effect of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245-Rif on wheat. Accordingly, DAPG enhanced Sp245-Rif traits involved in root colonization (cell motility, biofilm formation, and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production) and phytostimulation (auxin production). A differential fluorescence induction promoter-trapping approach based on flow cytometry was then used to identify Sp245-Rif genes upregulated by DAPG. DAPG enhanced expression of a wide range of Sp245-Rif genes, including genes involved in phytostimulation. Four of them (i.e., ppdC, flgE, nirK, and nifX-nifB) tended to be upregulated on roots in the presence of P. fluorescens F113 compared with its phl-negative mutant. Our results indicate that DAPG can act as a signal by which some beneficial pseudomonads may stimulate plant-beneficial activities of Azospirillum PGPR.

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