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Neuropsychol Rev. 2010 Dec;20(4):414-29. doi: 10.1007/s11065-010-9152-8. Epub 2010 Nov 3.

Early institutionalization: neurobiological consequences and genetic modifiers.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. margaret.sheridan@childrens.harvard.edu

Abstract

Children raised in the profound deprivation associated with institutionalization are at elevated risk for negative outcomes across a host of social and cognitive domains. This risk appears to be mitigated by early foster care or adoption into a family setting. Although pervasive developmental problems have been noted in a substantial proportion of previously institutionalized children, marked variation exists in the nature and severity of these deficits. Increasing evidence suggests that institutional deprivation impacts the developing brain, potentially underlying the wide range of outcomes with which it is associated. In the current review we examine the neural consequences of institutionalization and genetic factors associated with differences in outcome in an effort to characterize the consequences of early deprivation at a neurobiological level. Although the effects of institutional deprivation have been studied for more than 50 years much remains unanswered regarding the pathways through which institutionalization impacts child development. Through a more complete and nuanced assessment of the neural correlates of exposure and recovery as well as a better understanding of the individual factors involved we will be better able to delineate the impact of early adversity in the setting of severe social deprivation.

PMID:
21042937
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3100174
Free PMC Article
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