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AIDS Behav. 2011 Oct;15(7):1347-58. doi: 10.1007/s10461-010-9840-7.

The relative role of perceived partner risks in promoting condom use in a three-city sample of high-risk, low-income women.

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  • 1Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, David Geffen School of Medicine, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, 90025, USA.


We examined the effect of women's perceptions of sexual partner risks on condom use. Women from three US cities (n = 1,967) were recruited to provide data on HIV risks. In univariate models, increased odds of condom use were associated with perceiving that partners had concurrent partners and being unaware of partners': (a) HIV status, (b) bisexuality, (c) concurrency; and/or (d) injection drug use. In multivariate models, neither being unaware of the four partner risk factors nor perceiving a partner as being high risk was associated with condom use. Contextual factors associated with decreased odds of condom use were having sex with a main partner, homelessness in the past year, alcohol use during sex, and crack use in the past 30 days. Awareness of a partner's risks may not be sufficient for increasing condom use. Contextual factors, sex with a main partner in particular, decrease condom use despite awareness of partner risk factors.

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