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Am J Public Health. 2010 Dec;100(12):2418-25. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2009.185462. Epub 2010 Oct 21.

Improving the health and mental health of people living with HIV/AIDS: 12-month assessment of a behavioral intervention in Thailand.

Author information

  • 1Semel Institute Center for Community Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. lililili@ucla.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined findings from a randomized controlled intervention trial designed to improve the quality of life of people living with HIV in Thailand.

METHODS:

A total of 507 people living with HIV were recruited from 4 district hospitals in northern and northeastern Thailand and were randomized to an intervention group (n = 260) or a standard care group (n = 247). Computer-assisted personal interviews were administered at baseline and at 6 and 12 months.

RESULTS:

At baseline, the characteristics of participants in the intervention and standard care conditions were comparable. The mixed-effects models used to assess the impact of the intervention revealed significant improvements in general health (B = 2.51; P = .001) and mental health (B = 1.57; P = .02) among participants in the intervention condition over 12 months and declines among those in the standard care condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results demonstrate that a behavioral intervention was successful in improving the quality of life of people living with HIV. Such interventions must be performed in a systematic, collaborative manner to ensure their cultural relevance, sustainability, and overall success.

PMID:
20966372
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2978166
Free PMC Article

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