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Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2010 Aug;28(2):114-20.

[Environmental sanitation and mortality associated with waterborne diseases in children under 5 years of age in Brazil].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

  • 1Departamento de Informação em Saúde, Instituto de Comunicação e Informação Científica e Tecnológica em Saúde, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Manguinhos, Brazil. jbellido@icict.fiocruz.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Determine and evaluate the relationship between the variables for water conditions, environmental sanitation, and mortality in children under 5 years of age associated with a group of waterborne diseases.

METHODS:

An exploratory ecological study was conducted based on data obtained from the 2000 national demographic census and the Unified Health System for the 558 microregions of Brazil. The model used multiple linear regression analysis. Mortality associated with waterborne diseases in children under 5 years of age was considered to be the response variable. Water conditions, sanitation, and level of education were considered to be explanatory variables.

RESULTS:

A direct relationship was observed between inadequate sanitation in the dwelling (e.g., sewage disposal via rudimentary gutters and pits, the disposal of waste in uncultivated land or public areas) and mortality in children under 5 years of age associated with waterborne diseases. An inverse relationship was found between level of education and mortality associated with waterborne diseases in these children.

CONCLUSIONS:

The greatest health hazards related to poor sanitation were found in the microregions with a high concentration of low-income population with limited education. The general sanitation conditions and other factors related to dwelling quality and infrastructure are major determinants of mortality. Coverage of the water services, which reach 90% of households in Brazil, was not in itself found to be an important factor in the reduction of the mortality studied.

PMID:
20963278
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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