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J Immunol. 2010 Nov 15;185(10):6168-78. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1002520. Epub 2010 Oct 18.

Domain V peptides inhibit beta2-glycoprotein I-mediated mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion-induced tissue damage and inflammation.

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  • 1Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. sdflemin@ksu.edu

Abstract

Reperfusion of ischemic tissue induces significant tissue damage in multiple conditions, including myocardial infarctions, stroke, and transplantation. Although not as common, the mortality rate of mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion (IR) remains >70%. Although complement and naturally occurring Abs are known to mediate significant damage during IR, the target Ags are intracellular molecules. We investigated the role of the serum protein, β2-glycoprotein I as an initiating Ag for Ab recognition and β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) peptides as a therapeutic for mesenteric IR. The time course of β2-GPI binding to the tissue indicated binding and complement activation within 15 min postreperfusion. Treatment of wild-type mice with peptides corresponding to the lipid binding domain V of β2-GPI blocked intestinal injury and inflammation, including cellular influx and cytokine and eicosanoid production. The optimal therapeutic peptide (peptide 296) contained the lysine-rich region of domain V. In addition, damage and most inflammation were also blocked by peptide 305, which overlaps with peptide 296 but does not contain the lysine-rich, phospholipid-binding region. Importantly, peptide 296 retained efficacy after replacement of cysteine residues with serine. In addition, infusion of wild-type serum containing reduced levels of anti-β2-GPI Abs into Rag-1(-/-) mice prevented IR-induced intestinal damage and inflammation. Taken together, these data suggest that the serum protein β2-GPI initiates the IR-induced intestinal damage and inflammatory response and as such is a critical therapeutic target for IR-induced damage and inflammation.

PMID:
20956350
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3001127
Free PMC Article
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