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Xenotransplantation. 2010 Sep-Oct;17(5):379-90. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-3089.2010.00606.x.

Creation of a prevascularized site for cell transplantation in rats.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation Surgery, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria. philipp.stiegler@meduni-graz.at

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Transplanted cells, especially islet cells, are likely to become apoptotic due to local hypoxia leading to graft dysfunction. Isolated pancreatic islet cells depend on the diffusion of oxygen from the surrounding tissue; therefore, access to sufficient oxygen supply is beneficial, particularly when microcapsules are used for immunoisolation in xenotransplantation. The aim of this study was to create a prevascularized site for cell transplantation in rats and test its effectiveness with microencapsulated HEK293 cells.

METHODS:

The combination of implantation of a foam dressing, vacuum-assisted wound closure (foam+VAC) and hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) was used in 40 Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood flow and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were determined. Sodium cellulose sulphate (SCS)-microencapsulated HEK293 cells were xenotransplanted into the foam dressing in rats pre-treated with HBO, and angiogenesis and apoptosis were assessed.

RESULTS:

Vessel ingrowth and VEGF levels increased depending on the duration of HBO treatment. The area containing the foam was perfused significantly better in the experimental groups when compared to controls. Only a small amount of apoptosis occurs in SCS-microencapsulated HEK293 cells after xenotransplantation.

CONCLUSION:

As ischemia-damaged cells are likely to undergo cell death or loose functionality due to hypoxia, therefore leading to graft dysfunction, the combination foam+VAC and HBO might be a promising method to create a prevascularized site to achieve better results in xenogeneic cell transplantation.

© 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

PMID:
20955294
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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