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Curr Drug Deliv. 2010 Dec;7(5):442-6.

Botulinum A toxin intravesical injections for painful bladder syndrome: impact upon pain, psychological functioning and Quality of Life.

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  • 1Department of Urology and Andrology, University of Perugia, Italy. agianton@libero.it.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

To assess the impact of intravesically injected botulinum A toxin (BoNT/A) upon bladder pain, urological complaints, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and Quality of Life (QoL) in patients with painful bladder symptoms (PBS) refractory to conventional treatment.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In this prospective study 14 patients received one injection of BoNT/A (200 U diluted in 20 ml 0.9% NaCl), under cystoscopic guidance. At pre- and 3 months post- treatment all patients underwent an urological assessment (voiding diary, urodynamics), a pain quantification on a visual analog scale (VAS), an evaluation with the 14-item Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) to assess symptoms of psychic and somatic anxiety, an evaluation with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) to assess depression, and the 36-item Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF-36) to assess QoL. Results. At pre-treatment all 14 patients had increased daytime and nighttime urinary frequency and high VAS scores. Nine patients had pathological HAM-A scores and all had pathological HAM-D scores. At the 3-month follow-up 10/14 patients reported a subjective improvement in pain. Mean VAS score, mean daytime and nighttime urinary frequency decreased significantly (p <0.01, <0.01 and <0.01, respectively). All domains in SF-36 and HAM-A significantly improved (p<0.01). All domains, except weight and sleep disorders, significantly improved in HAM-D, particularly somatoform symptoms (p<0.01), cognitive performance (p<0.01), and circadian variations (p<0.01).

CONCLUSION:

In patients with refractory PBS with symptoms of anxiety, depression and poor QoL, BoNT/A intravesical treatment reduced bladder pain, improved psychological functioning, and well-being.

PMID:
20950262
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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