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J Biol Chem. 2010 Dec 17;285(51):40081-7. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M110.184457. Epub 2010 Oct 14.

Novel channel enzyme fusion proteins confer arsenate resistance.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

Steady exposure to environmental arsenic has led to the evolution of vital cellular detoxification mechanisms. Under aerobic conditions, a two-step process appears most common among microorganisms involving reduction of predominant, oxidized arsenate (H(2)As(V)O(4)(-)/HAs(V)O(4)(2-)) to arsenite (As(III)(OH)(3)) by a cytosolic enzyme (ArsC; Escherichia coli type arsenate reductase) and subsequent extrusion via ArsB (E. coli type arsenite transporter)/ACR3 (yeast type arsenite transporter). Here, we describe novel fusion proteins consisting of an aquaglyceroporin-derived arsenite channel with a C-terminal arsenate reductase domain of phosphotyrosine-phosphatase origin, providing transposable, single gene-encoded arsenate resistance. The fusion occurred in actinobacteria from soil, Frankia alni, and marine environments, Salinispora tropica; Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an analogous ACR3-ArsC fusion. Mutations rendered the aquaglyceroporin channel more polar resulting in lower glycerol permeability and enhanced arsenite selectivity. The arsenate reductase domain couples to thioredoxin and can complement arsenate-sensitive yeast strains. A second isoform with a nonfunctional channel may use the mycothiol/mycoredoxin cofactor pool. These channel enzymes constitute prototypes of a novel concept in metabolism in which a substrate is generated and compartmentalized by the same molecule. Immediate diffusion maintains the dynamic equilibrium and prevents toxic accumulation of metabolites in an energy-saving fashion.

PMID:
20947511
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3000990
Free PMC Article

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