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Methods Enzymol. 2010;470:281-315. doi: 10.1016/S0076-6879(10)70012-4. Epub 2010 Mar 1.

High-quality binary interactome mapping.

Author information

  • 1Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB), Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

Physical interactions mediated by proteins are critical for most cellular functions and altogether form a complex macromolecular "interactome" network. Systematic mapping of protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-RNA, and protein-metabolite interactions at the scale of the whole proteome can advance understanding of interactome networks with applications ranging from single protein functional characterization to discoveries on local and global systems properties. Since the early efforts at mapping protein-protein interactome networks a decade ago, the field has progressed rapidly giving rise to a growing number of interactome maps produced using high-throughput implementations of either binary protein-protein interaction assays or co-complex protein association methods. Although high-throughput methods are often thought to necessarily produce lower quality information than low-throughput experiments, we have recently demonstrated that proteome-scale interactome datasets can be produced with equal or superior quality than that observed in literature-curated datasets derived from large numbers of small-scale experiments. In addition to performing all experimental steps thoroughly and including all necessary controls and quality standards, careful verification of all interacting pairs and validation tests using independent, orthogonal assays are crucial to ensure the release of interactome maps of the highest possible quality. This chapter describes a high-quality, high-throughput binary protein-protein interactome mapping pipeline that includes these features.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20946815
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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