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Prostate. 2011 May;71(6):626-36. doi: 10.1002/pros.21278. Epub 2010 Oct 13.

Evidence of epithelial to mesenchymal transition associated with increased tumorigenic potential in an immortalized normal prostate epithelial cell line.

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  • 1Department of Cell Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The majority of established human prostate cancer cell lines are derived from metastatic lesions and are already tumorigenic in vivo, therefore immortalized normal prostate cell lines may provide a more relevant model to unveil the mechanisms associated with cancer progression and metastasis.

METHODS:

PZ-HPV-7, an immortalized human prostate epithelial cell line was used to generate xenograft tumors in mice. A subline designated HPV-PZ-7T was subsequently derived from the subrenal capsule xenograft of a nude mouse. These cells were further characterized using karyotyping, immunofluorescence, qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and three-dimensional cultures in Matrigel.

RESULTS:

The PZ-HPV-7 cell line possesses a typical epithelial morphology, expresses basal cell markers, and is capable of forming web-like structures with evidence of budding on Matrigel. PZ-HPV-7 is non-tumorigenic in immunocompromised mice by either subcutaneous injection or subrenal grafting. In contrast, the PZ-HPV-7T cells, derived from a xenograft tumor induced by co-inoculation with matrigel using subrenal grafting, possess a mesenchymal phenotype as well as luminal cell markers and are highly tumorigenic and metastatic in nude mice. Functionally and biochemically, the PZ-HPV-7T subline appears to have undergone an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) from the parental PZ-HPV-7 line.

CONCLUSION:

We have developed a novel EMT model using an immortalized normal prostate epithelial cell line and generated a new prostate cancer cell line, PZ-HPV-7T, which may represent an excellent system to study mechanisms associated with prostate cancer progression and metastasis.

Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

PMID:
20945502
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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