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Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2010 Oct;23(4):363-7.

Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in a tertiary care medical center.

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  • 1Intensive Care Unit (Obritsch) and Department of Infectious Diseases (Scheck), Hillcrest Medical Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma; the Department of Internal Medicine, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, Tulsa, Oklahoma (Stroup); and the Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa (Carnahan).

Abstract

This retrospective, case-control study aimed to identify variables associated with the incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) in acute care facilities and to specifically identify the relationship of fluoroquinolones and acid suppressive agents in the development of CDAD. Seventy-one symptomatic patients positive for C. difficile toxin A or B hospitalized for at least 72 hours were compared with 142 control patients hospitalized for at least 72 hours who were not positive for C. difficile toxin A or B. Two controls were matched to one case patient for age within 5 years, unit of admission, and date of admission. The mean ages for cases and controls were 63.5 and 62.7 years, respectively. After adjusting for two confounding variables-hospital stay within 3 months and Charlson Comorbidity Index-conditional multiple logistic regression identified six risk factors for development of CDAD: gastrointestinal procedures within 60 days (odds ratio [OR] 9.1, P < 0.013), levofloxacin exposure (OR 8.2, P < 0.033), moxifloxacin exposure (OR 4.1, P < 0.026), imipenem exposure (OR 14.9, P < 0.014), laxative use (OR 20.2, P < 0.0001), and immunosuppressive use (OR 20.7, P < 0.034). The risk of CDAD after exposure to levofloxacin or moxifloxacin was not significantly different. Acid suppressive therapy was not a risk factor for CDAD development.

PMID:
20944758
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2943450
Free PMC Article
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