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Diabetes. 2011 Jan;60(1):276-9. doi: 10.2337/db10-0186. Epub 2010 Oct 13.

Enterovirus RNA in blood is linked to the development of type 1 diabetes.

Author information

  • 1Department of Virology, University of Tampere, Finland. sami.oikarinen@uta.fi

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether the detection of enterovirus RNA in blood predicts the development of clinical type 1 diabetes in a prospective birth cohort study. Further, to study the role of enteroviruses in both the initiation of the process and the progression to type 1 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

This was a nested case-control study where all case children (N = 38) have progressed to clinical type 1 diabetes. Nondiabetic control children (N = 140) were pairwise matched for sex, date of birth, hospital district, and HLA-DQ-conferred genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. Serum samples, drawn at 3- to 12-month intervals, were screened for enterovirus RNA using RT-PCR.

RESULTS:

Enterovirus RNA-positive samples were more frequent among the case subjects than among the control subjects. A total of 5.1% of the samples (17 of 333) in the case group were enterovirus RNA-positive compared with 1.9% of the samples (19 of 993) in the control group (P < 0.01). The strongest risk for type 1 diabetes was related to enterovirus RNA positivity during the 6-month period preceding the first autoantibody-positive sample (odds ratio 7.7 [95% CI 1.9-31.5]). This risk effect was stronger in boys than in girls.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study supports the hypothesis that enteroviruses play a role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, especially in the initiation of the β-cell damaging process. The enterovirus-associated risk for type 1 diabetes may be stronger in boys than in girls.

PMID:
20943747
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3012181
Free PMC Article
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