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Hum Mol Genet. 2011 Jan 1;20(1):40-50. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddq430. Epub 2010 Oct 11.

DJ-1 acts in parallel to the PINK1/parkin pathway to control mitochondrial function and autophagy.

Author information

  • 1Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, Flow Cytometry Core Facility, National Institutes of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20982-3707, USA.

Abstract

Mutations in DJ-1, PINK1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1) and parkin all cause recessive parkinsonism in humans, but the relationships between these genes are not clearly defined. One event associated with loss of any of these genes is altered mitochondrial function. Recent evidence suggests that turnover of damaged mitochondria by autophagy might be central to the process of recessive parkinsonism. Here, we show that loss of DJ-1 leads to loss of mitochondrial polarization, fragmentation of mitochondria and accumulation of markers of autophagy (LC3 punctae and lipidation) around mitochondria in human dopaminergic cells. These effects are due to endogenous oxidative stress, as antioxidants will reverse all of them. Similar to PINK1 and parkin, DJ-1 also limits mitochondrial fragmentation in response to the mitochondrial toxin rotenone. Furthermore, overexpressed parkin will protect against loss of DJ-1 and, although DJ-1 does not alter PINK1 mitochondrial phenotypes, DJ-1 is still active against rotenone-induced damage in the absence of PINK1. None of the three proteins complex together using size exclusion chromatography. These data suggest that DJ-1 works in parallel to the PINK1/parkin pathway to maintain mitochondrial function in the presence of an oxidative environment.

PMID:
20940149
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3000675
Free PMC Article

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