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Cancer Res. 2010 Dec 1;70(23):9554-61. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-2211. Epub 2010 Oct 8.

Genotypes of NK cell KIR receptors, their ligands, and Fcγ receptors in the response of neuroblastoma patients to Hu14.18-IL2 immunotherapy.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.


Response to immunocytokine (IC) therapy is dependent on natural killer cells in murine neuroblastoma (NBL) models. Furthermore, killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)/KIR-ligand mismatch is associated with improved outcome to autologous stem cell transplant for NBL. Additionally, clinical antitumor response to monoclonal antibodies has been associated with specific polymorphic-FcγR alleles. Relapsed/refractory NBL patients received the hu14.18-IL2 IC (humanized anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody linked to human IL2) in a Children's Oncology Group phase II trial. In this report, these patients were genotyped for KIR, HLA, and FcR alleles to determine whether KIR receptor-ligand mismatch or specific FcγR alleles were associated with antitumor response. DNA samples were available for 38 of 39 patients enrolled: 24 were found to have autologous KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch; 14 were matched. Of the 24 mismatched patients, 7 experienced either complete response or improvement of their disease after IC therapy. There was no response or comparable improvement of disease in patients who were matched. Thus KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch was associated with response/improvement to IC (P = 0.03). There was a trend toward patients with the FcγR2A 131-H/H genotype showing a higher response rate than other FcγR2A genotypes (P = 0.06). These analyses indicate that response or improvement of relapsed/refractory NBL patients after IC treatment is associated with autologous KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch, consistent with a role for natural killer cells in this clinical response.

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