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J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2010 Oct;56(4):413-9. doi: 10.1097/FJC.0b013e3181f15b45.

The first clinical pilot study of intravenous adrenomedullin administration in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

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  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino-acid vasodilator peptide that was originally isolated from human pheochromocytoma. In the previous experimental study with rat ischemia/reperfusion model, AM reduced infarct size and inhibited myocyte apoptosis. AM also suppressed the production of oxygen-free radicals. The present study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of intravenous administration of AM in patients with acute myocardial infarction. We studied 10 patients with first acute myocardial infarction [male to female ratio: 9 to 1, age: 65 ± 9 (mean ± SD) years, peak creatine phosphokinase level: 4215 ± 1933 (SD) U/L], who were hospitalized within 12 hours of symptom onset. Proceeding reperfusion therapy, AM infusion was initiated and continued at concentration of 0.0125-0.025 μg·kg·min for 12 hours. Follow-up coronary angiography and left ventriculography were performed at 3 months. Cardiac magnetic resonance was examined at 1 month and 3 months after AM therapy. During infusion of AM, hemodynamics kept stable except 2 patients. Wall motion index in the infarct area at 3 months was significantly improved compared with that at baseline, and infarct size evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance was significantly decreased at 3 months. In conclusion, intravenous administration of AM, which possesses a variety of potential cardiovascular protective actions, can be adjunctive to percutaneous coronary intervention.

PMID:
20930593
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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