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Expert Rev Vaccines. 2010 Oct;9(10):1177-86. doi: 10.1586/erv.10.105.

Experimental rabies vaccines for humans.

Author information

  • Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Vaccine Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, 1020 Locust Street, JAH 466, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. james.mcgettigan@jefferson.edu

Abstract

Rabies remains a global public health threat that kills more than 55,000 people per year. Rabies disproportionately affects children and, therefore, is ranked the seventh most important infectious disease due to years lost. Prevention of human rabies is accomplished by controlling rabies in domestic and wild animals, including the use of vaccination programs. The usefulness of human rabies vaccines is hampered by high cost, complicated vaccination regimens and lack of compliance, especially in areas of Africa and Asia where human rabies infections are endemic. A single-dose vaccine would greatly benefit efforts to combat this global health threat. However, a single-dose vaccine based on current inactivated vaccines does not appear feasible and other approaches are needed. Technology has advanced since modern human rabies vaccines were developed over 40 years ago. In addition, our understanding of immunological principles that influence the outcome of vaccination has increased. This article describes the current status of inactivated rabies virus vaccines and recent developments arising from the use of reverse genetics technologies designed to develop replication-deficient or single-cycle live rabies virus-based vectors for use as a single-dose rabies vaccine for humans.

PMID:
20923268
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3072237
Free PMC Article

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