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Biomaterials. 2011 Jan;32(2):352-65. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.09.005.

The biocompatibility and separation performance of antioxidative polysulfone/vitamin E TPGS composite hollow fiber membranes.

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  • 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai, India.

Abstract

The extended interaction of blood with certain materials like hemodialysis membranes results in the activation of cellular element as well as inflammatory response. This results in hypersensitive reactions and increased reactive oxygen species, which occurs during or immediately after dialysis. Although polysulfone (Psf) hollow fiber has been commercially used for acute and chronic hemodialysis, its biocompatibility remains a major concern. To overcome this, we have successfully made composite Psf hollow fiber membrane consisting of hydrophilic/hydrophobic micro-domains of Psf and Vitamin E TPGS (TPGS). These were prepared by dry-wet spinning using 5, 10, 15, 20 wt% TPGS as an additive in dope solution. TPGS was successfully entrapped in Psf hollow fiber, as confirmed by ATR-FTIR and TGA. The selective skin was formed at inner side of hollow fibers, as confirmed by SEM study. In vitro biocompatibility and performance of the Psf/TPGS composite membranes were examined, with cytotoxicity, ROS generation, hemolysis, platelet adhesion, contact and complement activation, protein adsorption, ultrafiltration coefficient, solute rejection and urea clearance. We show that antioxidative composite Psf exhibits enhanced biocompatibility, and the membranes show high flux and high urea clearance, about two orders of magnitude better than commercial hemodialysis membranes on a unit area basis.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20888631
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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