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Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Dec;21(12):2315-6. doi: 10.1007/s10552-010-9646-y. Epub 2010 Sep 30.

Association of facial skin aging and vitamin D levels in middle-aged white women.

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  • 1Department of Dermatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 450 Broadway, Pavilion C, MC 5334, Redwood City, CA 94305, USA.

Abstract

To investigate the relationship between UV-induced skin photodamage and 25(OH) vitamin D levels, we performed a cross-sectional study in 45 female subjects aged >40. Menopausal status, smoking status, skin cancer history, oral supplement use, and season of blood draw were recorded and serum 25(OH)D measured. A single-blinded, dermatologist evaluated standardized digital facial images for overall photodamage, erythema/telangiectasias, hyperpigmentation, number of lentigines, and wrinkling. Adjusting for age and season of blood collection, women with lower photodamage scores were associated with a 5-fold increased odds of being vitamin D insufficient (OR 5.0, 95% CI: 1.1, 23). Low scores for specific photodamage parameters including erythema/telangiectasias, hyperpigmentation, and wrinkling were also significantly associated with vitamin D insufficiency. Our results suggest an association between skin aging and 25(OH)D levels.

PMID:
20882333
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3042365
Free PMC Article
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