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Neurology. 2010 Sep 28;75(13):1141-9. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181f4d80d.

MS quality of life, depression, and fatigue improve after mindfulness training: a randomized trial.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Hebelstrasse 2, Basel, Switzerland. PGrossman@uhbs.ch

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is often much reduced among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), and incidences of depression, fatigue, and anxiety are high. We examined effects of a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) compared to usual care (UC) upon HRQOL, depression, and fatigue among adults with relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive MS.

METHODS:

A total of 150 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 76) or to UC (n = 74). MBI consisted of a structured 8-week program of mindfulness training. Assessments were made at baseline, postintervention, and 6 months follow-up. Primary outcomes included disease-specific and disease-aspecific HRQOL, depression, and fatigue. Anxiety, personal goal attainment, and adherence to homework were secondary outcomes.

RESULTS:

Attrition was low in the intervention group (5%) and attendance rate high (92%). Employing intention-to-treat analysis, MBI, compared with UC, improved nonphysical dimensions of primary outcomes at postintervention and follow-up (p < 0.002); effect sizes, 0.4-0.9 posttreatment and 0.3-0.5 at follow-up. When analyses were repeated among subgroups with clinically relevant levels of preintervention depression, fatigue, or anxiety, postintervention and follow-up effects remained significant and effect sizes were larger than for the total sample.

CONCLUSIONS:

In addition to evidence of improved HRQOL and well-being, these findings demonstrate broad feasibility and acceptance of, as well as satisfaction and adherence with, a program of mindfulness training for patients with MS. The results may also have treatment implications for other chronic disorders that diminish HRQOL.

CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE:

This trial provides Class III evidence that MBI compared with UC improved HRQOL, fatigue, and depression up to 6 months postintervention.

PMID:
20876468
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3463050
Free PMC Article
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