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Immunity. 2010 Sep 24;33(3):301-11. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2010.09.002.

The mammalian target of rapamycin: linking T cell differentiation, function, and metabolism.

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  • 1Sidney-Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.

Abstract

In the two-signal model of T cell activation, the outcome of antigen recognition is determined by the integration of multiple cues in the immune microenvironment. mTOR is an evolutionarily conserved PI3-kinase family member that plays a central role in integrating environmental cues in the form of amino acids, energy, and growth factors. Recently, an increasingly important role for mTOR in directing T cell activation and differentiation has become apparent. Here we review recent findings demonstrating the ability of mTOR to interpret signals in the immune microenvironment and program the generation of CD4(+) effector versus regulatory T cells, the generation of CD8(+) effector versus memory cells, T cell trafficking, and T cell activation versus anergy. The key theme to emerge from these studies is that the central role of mTOR provides a direct link between T cell metabolism and function.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20870173
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2962404
Free PMC Article

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