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Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1257-64. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29786. Epub 2010 Sep 22.

Global prevalence and trends of overweight and obesity among preschool children.

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  • 1Growth Assessment and Surveillance Unit, Department of Nutrition for Health and Development, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. deonism@who.int

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Childhood obesity is associated with serious health problems and the risk of premature illness and death later in life. Monitoring related trends is important.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to quantify the worldwide prevalence and trends of overweight and obesity among preschool children on the basis of the new World Health Organization standards.

DESIGN:

A total of 450 nationally representative cross-sectional surveys from 144 countries were analyzed. Overweight and obesity were defined as the proportion of preschool children with values >2 SDs and >3 SDs, respectively, from the World Health Organization growth standard median. Being "at risk of overweight" was defined as the proportion with values >1 SD and ≤2 SDs, respectively. Linear mixed-effects modeling was used to estimate the rates and numbers of affected children.

RESULTS:

In 2010, 43 million children (35 million in developing countries) were estimated to be overweight and obese; 92 million were at risk of overweight. The worldwide prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity increased from 4.2% (95% CI: 3.2%, 5.2%) in 1990 to 6.7% (95% CI: 5.6%, 7.7%) in 2010. This trend is expected to reach 9.1% (95% CI: 7.3%, 10.9%), or ≈60 million, in 2020. The estimated prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in Africa in 2010 was 8.5% (95% CI: 7.4%, 9.5%) and is expected to reach 12.7% (95% CI: 10.6%, 14.8%) in 2020. The prevalence is lower in Asia than in Africa (4.9% in 2010), but the number of affected children (18 million) is higher in Asia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Childhood overweight and obesity have increased dramatically since 1990. These findings confirm the need for effective interventions starting as early as infancy to reverse anticipated trends.

PMID:
20861173
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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