Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Biol Chem. 2010 Nov 26;285(48):37271-80. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M110.123471. Epub 2010 Sep 22.

A unique redox-sensing sensor II motif in TorsinA plays a critical role in nucleotide and partner binding.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Texas 75390, USA.

Abstract

Early onset dystonia is commonly associated with the deletion of one of a pair of glutamate residues (ΔE302/303) near the C terminus of torsinA, a member of the AAA+ protein family (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. The functional consequences of the disease-causing mutation, ΔE, are not currently understood. By contrast to other AAA+ proteins, torsin proteins contain two conserved cysteine residues in the C-terminal domain, one of which is located in the nucleotide sensor II motif. Depending on redox status, an ATP hydrolysis mutant of torsinA interacts with lamina-associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1) and lumenal domain like LAP1 (LULL1). Substitution of the cysteine in sensor II diminishes the redox-regulated interaction of torsinA with these substrates. Significantly, the dystonia-causing mutation, ΔE, alters the ability of torsinA to mediate the redox-regulated interactions with LAP1 and LULL1. Limited proteolysis experiments reveal redox- and mutation-dependent changes in the local conformation of torsinA as a function of nucleotide binding. These results indicate that the cysteine-containing sensor II plays a critical role in redox sensing and the nucleotide and partner binding functions of torsinA and suggest that loss of this function of torsinA contributes to the development of DYT1 dystonia.

PMID:
20861018
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2988333
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (7)Free text

FIGURE 1.
FIGURE 2.
FIGURE 3.
FIGURE 4.
FIGURE 5.
FIGURE 6.
FIGURE 7.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk