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Injury. 2012 May;43(5):648-52. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2010.08.032. Epub 2010 Sep 16.

Maintenance of normothermia during burn surgery with an intravascular temperature control system: a non-randomised controlled trial.

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  • 1Burn Center and Intensive Care Unit, Sainte Anne Military Teaching Hospital, Toulon, France. bertrand.prunet@orange.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hypothermia remains one of the major factors limiting surgery in extensively burned patients. We evaluated the effectiveness of an intravascular rewarming technique using CoolGard 3000™ system and Icy™ catheter to maintain normothermia during surgeries of severe burned patients and compared these findings to a historical control group.

METHODS:

This was a controlled non-randomised trial conducted between March 2008 and August 2009. Patients with burns greater than or equal to 40% of the total body surface area were included. Before the first burn excision, the Icy™ catheter was placed in the inferior vena cava via the femoral vein. Warming was then initiated and maintained until the bladder temperature reached over 37.5°C. The bladder temperature was recorded every 30min during surgery and for the first hour post-operatively and compared to a historical control group.

RESULTS:

We enrolled 4 patients and 11 surgeries in the CoolGard™ group and compared them to 3 patients and 10 surgeries in the historical cohort. All intraoperative bladder temperatures from T=30 were statistically different in the two groups. In the CoolGard™ group, no patient became hypothermic and no surgery was aborted because the patient's temperature had rapidly fallen below the threshold temperature (35.5°C). No device-related complication was reported.

CONCLUSION:

The use of an intravenous warming catheter is a novel approach to maintain normothermia during surgery in burn victims and may be more effective than traditional methods.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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