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Psychiatry Res. 2010 Nov 30;184(2):63-70. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2010.07.003. Epub 2010 Sep 15.

Regional cortical gray matter thickness differences associated with type 2 diabetes and major depression.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. oajilore@psych.uic.edu

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of type 2 diabetes with major depression on cortical gray matter using magnetic resonance imaging and cortical pattern matching techniques. We hypothesized that diabetic subjects and depressed diabetic subjects would demonstrate decreased cortical gray matter thickness in prefrontal areas as compared to healthy control subjects. Patients with type 2 diabetes (n=26) and patients with diabetes and major depression (n=26) were compared with healthy controls (n=20). Gray matter thickness across the entire cortex was measured using cortical pattern matching methods. All subjects with diabetes demonstrated decreased cortical gray matter thickness in the left anterior cingulate region. Additionally, depressed diabetic subjects showed significant cortical gray matter decreases in bilateral prefrontal areas compared with healthy controls. Correlations between clinical variables and cortical gray matter thickness revealed a significant negative relationship with cerebrovascular risk factors across all three groups, most consistently in the left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. A significant positive relationship between performance on attention and executive function tasks and cortical gray matter thickness predominantly in left hemisphere regions was also seen across all subjects. Depression and diabetes are associated with significant cortical gray matter thinning in medial prefrontal areas.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20832254
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2963701
Free PMC Article
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