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Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2010 Nov;13(6):601-7. doi: 10.1097/MCO.0b013e32833ef30e.

Do all sedentary activities lead to weight gain: sleep does not.

Author information

  • 1Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. jepc@life.ku.dk

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To discuss the benefits of having a good night's sleep for body weight stability.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Experimental studies have shown that short-term partial sleep restriction decreases glucose tolerance, increases sympathetic tone, elevates cortisol concentrations, decreases the satiety hormone leptin, increases the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin, and increases hunger and appetite. Short sleep duration might increase the risk of becoming obese, because it does not allow the recovery of a hormonal profile facilitating appetite control. Lack of sleep could also lead to weight gain and obesity by increasing the time available for eating and by making the maintenance of a healthy lifestyle more difficult. Furthermore, the increased fatigue and tiredness associated with sleeping too little could lessen one's resolve to follow exercise regimens.

SUMMARY:

Short sleep duration appears to be a novel and independent risk factor for obesity. With the growing prevalence of chronic sleep restriction, any causal association between reduced sleep and obesity would have substantial importance from a public health standpoint. Future research is needed to determine whether sleep extension in sleep-deprived obese individuals will influence appetite control and/or reduce the amount of body fat.

PMID:
20823775
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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