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J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Aug;14(7):507-13.

Relationship of a dominant advanced glycation end product, serum carboxymethyl-lysine, and abnormal glucose metabolism in adults: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

Author information

  • 1Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. rdsemba@jhmi.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Although hyperglycemia is thought to increase the generation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), studies have not shown a consistent relationship between abnormal glucose metabolism and serum AGEs. We investigated the relationship between a dominant serum AGE, N-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), and glucose metabolism.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Serum CML, fasting plasma glucose, and glucose tolerance were measured in 755 adults in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Fasting plasma glucose was categorized as normal (< or = 99 mg/dL), impaired (100-125 mg/dL), and diabetic (> 125 mg/dL). Two-hour plasma glucose on oral glucose tolerance testing was categorized as normal (< or = 139 mg/dL), impaired (140-199 mg/dL), and diabetic (> or = 200 mg/dL).

RESULTS:

The proportion of adults with normal, impaired, and diabetic fasting plasma glucose was 73.8%, 22.9%, and 2.9%, respectively, and the proportion with normal, impaired, and diabetic 2-hour plasma glucose was 73.1%, 19.2%, and 7.7%, respectively. Serum CML (microg/mL) was not associated with abnormal fasting plasma glucose (Odds Ratio [O.R.] 0.60, 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 0.15-2.36, P = 0.47) in a multivariate, ordered logistic regression model, adjusting for age, race, gender, body mass index, and chronic diseases. Serum CML (microg/mL) was associated with abnormal 2-hour plasma glucose on glucose tolerance testing (O.R. 0.15, 95% C.I. 0.04-0.63, P = 0.009) in a multivariate, ordered logistic regression model, adjusting for the same covariates.

CONCLUSIONS:

Elevated CML, a dominant AGE, was not associated with elevated fasting plasma glucose and was associated with a reduced odds of abnormal glucose tolerance in older community-dwelling adults.

PMID:
20818463
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3435097
Free PMC Article
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