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Physiother Can. 2009 Fall;61(4):197-209. doi: 10.3138/physio.61.4.197. Epub 2009 Nov 12.

Regional muscle and whole-body composition factors related to mobility in older individuals: a review.

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  • 1Department of Physical Therapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe previously reported locomotor muscle and whole-body composition factors related to mobility in older individuals.

METHODS:

A narrative review of the literature, including a combination of search terms related to muscle and whole-body composition factors and to mobility in older individuals, was carried out. Statistical measures of association and risk were consolidated to summarize the common effects between studies.

RESULTS:

Fifty-three studies were reviewed. Muscle and whole-body factors accounted for a substantial amount of the variability in walking speed, with coefficients of determination ranging from 0.30 to 0.47. Muscle power consistently accounted for a greater percentage of the variance in mobility than did strength. Risks associated with high fat mass presented a minimum odds ratio (OR) of 0.70 and a maximum OR of 4.07, while the minimum and maximum ORs associated with low lean mass were 0.87 and 2.30 respectively. Whole-body and regional fat deposits accounted for significant amounts of the variance in mobility.

CONCLUSION:

Muscle power accounts for a greater amount of the variance in the level of mobility in older individuals than does muscle strength. Whole-body fat accounts for a greater amount of the variance in level of mobility than does whole-body lean tissue. Fat stored within muscle also appears to increase the risk of a mobility limitation in older individuals.

KEYWORDS:

disability; fat; mobility; muscle; power; sarcopenia; strength

PMID:
20808481
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2793694
Free PMC Article

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