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Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):186-92. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.110.078485.

Neurodevelopmental marker for limbic maldevelopment in antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Criminology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 19104, USA. araine@sas.upenn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy have been hypothesised to have a neurodevelopmental basis, but this proposition has not been formally tested.

AIMS:

This study tests the hypothesis that individuals with cavum septum pellucidum (CSP), a marker of limbic neural maldevelopment, will show higher levels of psychopathy and antisocial personality.

METHOD:

Cavum septum pellucidum was assessed using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging in a community sample. Those with CSP (n = 19) were compared with those lacking CSP (n = 68) on antisocial personality, psychopathy and criminal offending.

RESULTS:

Those with CSP had significantly higher levels of antisocial personality, psychopathy, arrests and convictions compared with controls. The pervasiveness of this association was indicated by the fact that those lacking a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, but who were charged or convicted for an offence, had a more extensive CSP than non-antisocial controls. Results could not be attributed to prior trauma exposure, head injury, demographic factors or comorbid psychiatric conditions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings appear to be the first to provide evidence for a neurodevelopmental brain abnormality in those with antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy, and support the hypothesis that early maldevelopment of limbic and septal structures predisposes to the spectrum of antisocial behaviours.

PMID:
20807962
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2930915
Free PMC Article

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