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Diabetes Technol Ther. 2010 Oct;12(10):823-31. doi: 10.1089/dia.2010.0027.

Use of insulin pumps in India: suggested guidelines based on experience and cultural differences.

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  • 1Jothydev's Diabetes and Research Center, Trivandrum, Kerala, India. jothydev@vsnl.com

Abstract

All type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) subjects and the majority of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects at one time or another require insulin to sustain life. Syringes and pens are presently the most popular insulin delivery devices. Though in use for more than 3 decades, insulin pumps are now being more commonly used because of their unique ability to continuously infuse insulin, closely mimicking that of physiological secretion from a normal pancreas. Unlike insulin shots with syringes, pump infusion sites need to be changed less frequently. Scientific evidence from published studies have proven added benefit of insulin pumps in improving quality of life, normalizing sugars in recalcitrant diabetes, improving sexual function, and relieving the intractable pain of neuropathy. In the western world, pumps are commonly used with T1DM subjects, whereas in India 80% of pumpers are T2DM subjects. The success of insulin pump therapy depends on selection of the right candidate, extensive education, motivation, and implementing the sophisticated programs with skill. However, all affordable patients are not ideal candidates for pump therapy because for successful continuation of pump therapy other inclusion criteria should also be fulfilled. Among the other indications discussed are a high level of insulin resistance, brittle diabetes, chronic kidney disease on renal replacement therapy, and continuous glucose monitoring pattern strongly suggesting need for a variable basal insulin infusion rate. In International Diabetes Foundation data released in 2009, estimated diabetes prevalence for 2010 is 285 million, representing 6.4% of the world's adult population, with a prediction that by 2030 the number of people with diabetes will have increased to 438 million. Considering this massive growth in T2DM and its propensity after 10–15 years to lead to an insulin-deficient state, available evidence from studies is a compelling indication not to deny the benefits of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in selected T2DM subjects. This article aims at suggesting guidelines based on clinical experience and cultural diversity for India and developing countries.

PMID:
20807118
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2956384
Free PMC Article
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